creativity: a love hate relationship
 Vincent Van Gogh only sold 2 paintings before he committed suicide at the age of 37. Today his highly influential works are coveted by museums and private collectors alike – commanding prices in the tens of millions. Image – detail from a portrait by Van Gogh.
We’ve all heard the story about the brilliant painter, musician, or scientist who was “ahead of his time”, whose genius – for one reason or another – was ridiculed or worse yet, not even noticed. What is it that has historically prevented humans from celebrating some of the most brilliant and creative ideas of their time? Recent research into how the human brain accepts, or rejects new ideas is beginning to shed some light on this conundrum and what seems to be emerging from the results is a mounting body of evidence indicating a human bias against creativity. Article author and Professor, David Burkus, sums it up like this, “For a work to be truly creative, it has to depart from the status quo at some point. That departure makes many people uncomfortable. Despite our oft-stated desire for more creativity, we also hold a stronger desire for certainty and structure. When that certainty is challenged, a bias against creativity develops.”
So what is a creative person to do? Burkus was also kind enough to offer a few tips on how to present your creative ideas while maximizing certainty:1 – Re-affirm what your audience already knows to be true about the topic of focus.2 – Connect your creative idea to more familiar ideas (such as previously successful projects).3 – (This one is a tricky bonus) Lead your audience towards your idea with a series of statements they will agree with, then pitch your idea as though it was theirs. This counteracts the bias against creativity with a more powerful bias… the bias for one’s own ideas! Full article here.
via: dpagesblog

creativity: a love hate relationship

 Vincent Van Gogh only sold 2 paintings before he committed suicide at the age of 37. Today his highly influential works are coveted by museums and private collectors alike – commanding prices in the tens of millions. Image – detail from a portrait by Van Gogh.

We’ve all heard the story about the brilliant painter, musician, or scientist who was “ahead of his time”, whose genius – for one reason or another – was ridiculed or worse yet, not even noticed. What is it that has historically prevented humans from celebrating some of the most brilliant and creative ideas of their time? Recent research into how the human brain accepts, or rejects new ideas is beginning to shed some light on this conundrum and what seems to be emerging from the results is a mounting body of evidence indicating a human bias against creativity. Article author and Professor, David Burkus, sums it up like this, “For a work to be truly creative, it has to depart from the status quo at some point. That departure makes many people uncomfortable. Despite our oft-stated desire for more creativity, we also hold a stronger desire for certainty and structure. When that certainty is challenged, a bias against creativity develops.”

So what is a creative person to do? Burkus was also kind enough to offer a few tips on how to present your creative ideas while maximizing certainty:
1 – Re-affirm what your audience already knows to be true about the topic of focus.
2 – Connect your creative idea to more familiar ideas (such as previously successful projects).
3 – (This one is a tricky bonus) Lead your audience towards your idea with a series of statements they will agree with, then pitch your idea as though it was theirs. This counteracts the bias against creativity with a more powerful bias… the bias for one’s own ideas! Full article here.

via: dpagesblog

via: ATELIER

..! creativity online presents the 2010 creativity 50.

texturism:

goodeggs:

..! big things people. creativity magazine creates this annual list of the fifty most inspiring and influential creative personalities.

you will certainly recognize many a name & company — marco from tumblr, the founders of posterous, lady gaga [naturally], the founders of opening ceremony & many a business guru & advertising/marketing professional that are demanding & producing exciting work.

investigate this list.  these are people to watch & learn from, most certainly.

Feel now, think later, for more flowing creativity

psychotherapy:

Creating can be an emotional process. But there’s good emotional—even when you’re sad or the work epitomizes sorrow—and there’s bad emotional. That’s when your inner critic attacks you, calls you mean names, and causes you not to feel like creating anymore.

One of the ways you may slip out of flow when you’re creating something is if you don’t feel that what you’re producing—your internal feedback—matches what you had in mind originally, that is, your internal ideal. Of course, apprehension due to such non-matching is helpful when it warns you to go back and revise the substandard work. In fact, that’s an essential part of the flow process. It’s only dysfunctional when it makes you feel too bad to continue working, then or later…

INNER-CRITIC ANESTHETIZING TIPS

  • Let it flow. Remind yourself regularly that, while you’re immersed in the creative process, there’s absolutely no sense in feeling embarrassed. Even if what comes out at first is crude, stiff, inappropriate, or simple-minded, tell your internal critic to take a hike, that he/she/it is simply getting in your way.
  • Write without thinking. According to New Yorker-published poet Stephen Perry, “If you just put down words, whatever pops into your head, meandering here and there, free-associating, allowing whatever sputters out to sputter out, amazingly, after a short interval, something takes hold, some comet wraps its tail around you like a kinetic Cheshire Cat, and you’re off.” Don’t worry about punctuation, spelling, point-of-view, character, plot, any of the technical aspects of your particular art or craft. They can always be cleaned up later.
  • Write from your emotions. If you get emotionally involved enough with your subject, if you really feel it as you’re writing or creating something about it, you’ll forget to be self-conscious. If you’re not in an emotional mood, try putting yourself into one. Many artists say they listen to a particular piece of music that’s emotionally stirring as they begin creating. Experiment.

The Music of Creativity

Daniel Kobialka, “Sleepers Awake” and “Sheep May Safely Graze” (J.S. Bach) from Daniel Kobialka Performs (Li-Sem)

George Bizet, Symphony in C (Beecham-EMI)

Cesar Franck, Psyche (Strauss-Connoisseur Society)

Henry Mancini, “Meggie’s Theme” and “The Thorn Birds Theme” from In the Pink (Galway, Mancini - RCA)

Essential Musical Intelligence, Louise Montello